Can you afford your pet’s care?

Living in Canada, we are used to the idea of subsidized health care for ourselves when we get sick. Doctor’s visits, diagnostic testing and even many treatments are (with some exceptions) covered by provincial health care systems. While client service and wait times are often noted as down-sides of this system, it certainly is nice at the end of a hospital stay when we can simply walk out without a bill. My wife recently gave birth to twins, and I cannot even begin to imagine what 3 weeks in the neonatal ICU would have cost if we were to pay
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Do I really need a Heartworm test?

  June 1st is the start of Heartworm season in southern Ontario; although the mosquitos have been biting for months, this is the time by which we have had enough warm days for the Heartworm larvae to develop to an infective stage and be carried by the mosquitos to our dogs. Traditionally, a Heartworm preventative is given once monthly throughout the summer months to kill off any Heartworm larvae that might have been transmitted from a mosquito bite into your dog’s blood, before the larvae can form into the stringy white worms that live and breed in the blood vessels
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Our Pets are very active, and so are TICKS!

After a very long winter, things have now warmed up and the creepy crawly bugs are back on the prowl. Ticks are now on the go, looking for their next meal! Did you know that ticks are active during any temperatures above 4 degrees Celsius! Ticks will attach onto our furry friend’s skin, feasting on their blood. However, if these ticks are infected with a disease, they can now transmit this onto the pet they are feeding on. These ticks can be picked up in vegetative areas like forests and meadows. The low-lying stature of dogs compared to humans makes
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What in the world in Echinococcus multilocularis (and why should I care?)

June and July brings creepy-crawly, icky, disgusting parasites into focus on our blog here at Caledon Mountain Veterinary Hospital. For the most part, parasites are not a big concern for people living in the western world, unless you child comes home from school with lice. But since our pets go places we don’t go, eat things that we don’t eat, and roll in stuff that we don’t (usually) roll in, they are a different story for our companion animals. Echinococcus multilocularis is a different story, however, and the story reads a little like horror novel if you ask me. More
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